Mission Statement  

To stimulate growth in student achievement by continuing efforts to advance the development of all stakeholders- students, parents, staff, and the community.

  About The School  

Georgia Common Core Standards

http://www.metter.org/?DivisionID=3420&ToggleSideNav=

The link above will give you very concise information about Common Core GPS and rollout of assessments. Scroll down to access quick information and links to parent guides.

 


MIS SCHOOLWIDE PLAN

(May 30, 2014)

School Name: Metter Intermediate School

 

 

School Mailing Address: 33661 Highway 129 South, Metter, Ga. 30439

 

 

 

LEA Name: Candler County School District

 

 

LEA Title One Director/Coordinator Name: Dr. CaDeisha Cooper

 

 

LEA Title One Director/Coordinator Signature:

 

 

 

Date:

LEA Title One Director/Coordinator Mailing   Address:

Candler   County BOE

210 South College Street

Metter, GA 30439

 

Email Address:

ccooper@metter.org

 

Telephone: (912) 685-5713

Fax:

(912) 685-2076

 

SWP/SIP Template Instructions

Notes:

· All components of a Title I Schoolwide Program Plan and a School Improvement Plan must be addressed. When using SWP and SIP checklists all components/elements marked as “Not Met” need additional development.

· Please add your planning committee members on the next page.

· The asterisk (*) denotes required components as set forth in Section 1114 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA).

· Please submit your School Improvement Plan as an addendum after the header page in this document.

                       

 

SIP Components

  

  

*1. A comprehensive needs assessment of the    entire school that addresses all academic areas and other factors that may    affect achievement.

  

Response:

A. We have developed our schoolwide plan with   the participation of individuals who will carry out the comprehensive   schoolwide/school improvement program plan. Those persons involved were . . .   The ways they were involved were . . .

We have developed our schoolwide plan in   conjunction with a variety of stakeholders---community members, staff   members, students and parents--- who will assist in following the   comprehensive schoolwide/school improvement program plan. School Council   meetings, parent meetings, and staff meetings were used to revise and   complete the MIS Title One Schoolwide Plan. Metter Intermediate School   faculty met after school, post planning and preplanning in August to analyze   the data and formulate the plan for school-wide improvement. The MIS School   Council, which consists of business, parent, and teacher representatives   reviewed, discussed, and offered input as well. Parent Nights were also used   to gather input from parents as well as student, parent, and staff surveys.

B. We have used the following instruments,   procedures, or processes to obtain this information . . . (Be sure to use   brainstorming as a strategy for Needs Assessment.)

We have used the following instruments,   procedures, or processes to obtain this information:

·       CRCT Results

·       TKES

·       LKES

·       Formative, summative, and Benchmark Results

·       iSTEEP probes for reading fluency and math fluency

·       5th Grade Writing Assessment

·       Sidewalks Screener

·       Progress Monitoring

·       RTI

·       School CCRPI

·       District CCRPI

·       Staff Survey

·       District Survey

·       Parent Survey

·       Student Survey

The information gathered from these sources   was analyzed quarterly to measure CCRPI standards and the Schoolwide   Improvement Plan and CRCT results for Reading/English Language Arts, Math,   Science and Social Studies. Instruments that assess student achievement were   reviewed to determine specific areas of student strengths and weaknesses.   Various surveys helped to determine factors from other sources (parents,   staff, and students) that impact student achievement and indicate school   needs.

All faculty members are involved annually in   analysis of data regarding the achievement of all students in the building: regular   education, special education, talented and gifted, migrant, bilingual, etc.   Principals are required to report the results of the data analysis to the Candler   County Board of Education Members and the community at-large. School   administrators, teachers, district administrators, the superintendent, and   students form goals based on the analysis of data. Students who are not   achieving on grade level are identified and targeted for additional   assistance. Faculty members are surveyed to determine their strengths and   weaknesses in order to plan for professional development targeted to teacher   needs and to school and district goals.

C. We have taken into account the needs of   migrant children by (or if you have no migratory students . . . these are the   procedures we would follow should those students be in attendance)

The identification of migrant children was   determined as parents completed an Occupational Survey Form when registering   students at our school. The information is then given to our ESOL teacher and   Migrant paraprofessional. After identification, the needs of migrant students   are met in the following manner:

·       A Migrant Family Intervention Specialist is assigned to our   school to provide assistance in contacting families and getting necessary services   and resources. The MFIS also is in classes two days per week with identified   migrant students.

·       Professional Learning provided for staff from the ESOL   Coordinator and ESOL teacher (overview & tips for working with students)   during this school year at staff and professional learning community   meetings. Teachers include WIDA standards and differentiated learning   activities with weekly lesson plans.

·       Mentors are assigned to specific students for extra support as   needed.

·       Certain migrant students also qualify for ESOL services based on   ACCESS and W-APT testing.

Academic needs are assessed and met through   other available school programs as indicated.

D. We have reflected current achievement data   that will help the school understand the subjects and skills in which   teaching and learning need to be improved. For example . . .

5th grade Writing Assessment   results remain below the state average.

4th grade fact fluency is a major   concern each year when school begins. A majority of 4th grade math   students, after a fluency probe, are found to be in the frustrational level.

3rd grade students did not meet the   math CRCT spring 2014 at a 17% DNM rate.

E. We have based our plan on information about   all students in the school and identified students and groups of students who   are not yet achieving to the State Academic content standards and the State   student academic achievement standard including

CCPRI:

Close the gap for economically disadvantaged   students in science

Close the gap for black boys in reading

close the gap for ELL   students in social studies

F. The data has helped us reach conclusions   regarding achievement or other related data.

The major strength at MIS in our academic   program is the fact that the teachers know individual students’ strengths and   weaknesses. The teachers are focused on results of state assessments,   formative and summatives in the classroom, as well as progress monitoring and   response to intervention(s). Teachers create flexible small groups based on   classroom assessment and provide focused remediation and enrichment via   differentiated instruction. They also meet weekly to plan and assess student   learning in twin and professional learning community settings. Emphasis on   manipulatives/concrete representations, weekly math progress monitoring,   current standard focused math instruction in the after school program, Saxon   Math to close skills gaps, Coach and Progress Coach books all contribute to   our high math achievement rates. Math Tiger Time focuses on student skill areas   that were below grade level. Sidewalks Tiger Time focuses on student skill   areas in reading that were below grade level.   The MIS Reading Intervention Specialist completes 3 yearly iSteep and   other progress monitoring in the areas of reading comprehension, reading   fluency, and math fact fluency. Small   group instruction during retest focus time also supports the high pass rate   for 4th and 5th grade reading and math. Students track   fluency progress in individual fluency logs. 4th and 5th grade   gifted and high achieving students are offered daily Tiger Time that focuses   on acceleration in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) and   reading through the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl competition. Data about exceeds   5th Tier II math interventions take priority for scheduling during   Tiger Time Remediation and students receive small group instruction based on   IRL. Several students also receive a double dose of reading comprehension and   fluency intervention through daily pull out to focus on individual skill gaps.   Rigby Books, extended texts, motivation incentives for AR goals, leveled   readers, mentor texts, coach books, TIME for Kids, and Classworks resources   are used to assist with individual student instruction. Reading and   conference logs motivate student growth in reading comprehension and volume   of reading. An EIP reading teacher and EIP math paraprofessional provide   assistance daily in small group pullout.   One factor is that we do not schedule ESOL classes during reading   instruction. Parental support is most necessary and beneficial for student   achievement. Substitutes being available for parent conferences increase   opportunities for student needs/goals to be regularly communicated. Science   and Social Studies content areas focus on sub group achievement gaps and   literacy strategies as required by CCGPS utilizing small group DI   instruction, support personnel, Studies Weekly, project based learning, text   related workbooks, maps and atlases.   An EIP reduced class size was used in 4th grade to provide   more focused instruction on students who were at risk due to previous grade   retention, failure on standardized testing, and were being served through RTI   and Student Support Team.

Using the research based reading support   program of SIDEWALKS provides Tier II extra support for students reading   below grade level. This program targets fluency and comprehension. The   employment of a Reading Intervention Specialist to pull out small groups of   students to work on fluency also has had a positive impact on student   learning.

One of the major needs that we discovered was   that more time was necessary in the mornings for Tier I and Tier II reading   and math to provide a full SIDEWALKS or SAXON MATH lesson.

The needs we will address are:

· Have students read books on/above Lexile   level

. Regular math fluency probes in all classes

· Daily Reader’s Workshop in all Reading   classes

 

. Use   of a research-based basal series in Reading/ELA classes, (Journeys, local   QBE)

. Daily   Writer’s Workshop in all ELA classes

· Science and Social Studies support personnel   to assist with PEC and at risk students

Lexia to increase Lexile scores, reading   fluency and comprehension, and strengthen writing skills

 

. 3rd,   4th, and 5th grade Science and Social Studies fairs to   emphasize the use of research skills, informational texts, speaking skills,   and writing across the curriculum.

The specific academic needs of those students   that are to be addressed in the school wide program will be:

· Motivation to increase reading volume and   comprehension

· 3rd and 4th grade math   focus on fact fluency first semester

· Careful attention to student scheduling   needs so as to maximize available human resources

· Cross curricular writing plan will assist in   achievement gains on the 5th grade writing test

· Achievement Gaps are noted for sub groups as   compared to total student population in the content areas of Science and   Social Students

The ROOTCAUSE/s that we discovered for each of   the needs were:

· Historical iSTEEP data indicates the need   for math fact fluency remediation

· Historically data indicates lagging sub   group achievement in the Science and Social Studies content areas

· Candler County writing plan initiatives will   be carried out in each content area

G. The measurable goals/benchmarks we   have established to address the needs were . . .

· Tiger Time scheduled for 45 minutes at the   beginning of each day, with homeroom at the end of the day

· Use positive motivation opportunities to   encourage students to read more and pass AR tests with 80% or more accuracy

· Students will track individual fact fluency   progress as they work toward mastery

· Schedule support personnel to assist with   the needs of PEC and at risk students in Science and Social Studies

Artifacts/Evidence: Revision with date, committee members   with signatures, agenda, & minutes

instruments/procedures; analysis of data by   subgroup; analysis of parent spring survey and how results are shared

with parents; needs of ELL, migrant, SWD, ED;   root causes of needs; specific academic needs; measurable

goals; Certified Staff Survey with narrative   of strengths and weaknesses; Title I program evaluation with agenda,

minutes, and participant signatures

 

  

  

*2. Schoolwide reform strategies that are    scientifically researched based.

  

Response:

MIS incorporates scientifically researched   based reform strategies that are proven to increase student learning in all   classes including, but not limited to 6 Elements of a Math Lesson, 5 Pillars   of Reading, leveled content-specific readers and Sidewalks Reading   Intervention Series as well as Saxon math. See page 9 Question 2B response.

 

  

  

2(a). Schoolwide reform strategies that    provide opportunities for all children in the school to meet or exceed    Georgia’s proficient and advanced levels of student performance.

  

A. Response: The ways in which we will   address the needs of all children in the school particularly the needs of   students furthest away from demonstrating proficiency related to the State’s   academic content and student academic achievement standard are . . . (Strategies   to be used.)

Strategies to address the needs of all MIS   students, particularly the needs of students furthest away from demonstrating   proficiency related to the State’s academic content, include:

·       Interpret and analyze on-going, school-wide assessments (iSTEEP   probes for reading fluency and math fluency, periodic writing assessments)   providing flexible grouping and differentiated instruction based on results.

·       Provide planning times/days with substitutes provided and adequate   time for collaboration including content based professional learning   communities.

·       Continue to implement and refine Before/During/After Framework   and literacy strategies in all classrooms.

·       Continue to implement and refine Standards-Based Classroom   components in all classrooms.

·       Continue to implement Writing across the Curriculum in all   classrooms.

·       Provide differentiated instruction for all achievement levels   and subgroups

·       Utilize co-teaching and inclusion model of instruction for   students with disabilities, ELL students, and EIP students.

·       Provide before and after school instruction to preview and   reinforce the curriculum.

·       Incorporate use of technology (SMARTBoards, chrome books,   classroom computers, My Big Campus, flipped classrooms, Skype, Glogster,   Music Box, Lexia, Classworks, bring your own technology, laptops, CPS Units,   etc.) during instruction.

·       Utilize reading and writing workshops for implementation of   reading/language arts standards.

·       Utilize non-fiction selections (such as leveled readers,   extended texts, mentor texts, and other high interest sources) for teaching   reading/language arts standards through cross core content.

 

2(b). Are based upon effective means of   raising student achievement.

B. Response: Following (or in our   appendices) are examples of the SCIENTIFICALLY BASED RESEARCH supporting our   effective methods and instructional practices or strategies. (Cite Research to support selected   strategies.)

Scientifically-based strategies to address the   needs of all MIS students, particularly the needs of students furthest away   from demonstrating proficiency related to the State’s academic content,   include:

·       Utilize programs and resources for specific student needs such   as: Sidewalks Reading Remediation, iSTEEP Reading Center, Lexia, Classworks;   Marzano’s Academic Vocabulary; STEEP Benchmark Fluency; Leveled Reading   Library; Accelerated Reading Rewards Reading Program; Tiger Time for math   remediation and reading remediation and enrichment; basal reading and   language arts series, and Saxon Math.

·       Incorporate project-based and cooperative learning in classrooms   and during Tiger Time through Science and Social Studies fairs.

Communicate to both students and parents   through school newsletters, school website, agendas, Families Being Involved   (FBI) meetings, School Council, Phone Tree, School Counselor, and phone calls   to homes of absent students to emphasize the importance of school attendance   and its’ impact on achievement.

 

  

  

2(c). Use effective instructional methods    that increase the quality and amount of
   learning time.

  

C. Response: We will increase   the amount and quality of learning time by . . . (Before/After school,   summer school, Saturday school, block scheduling)

We will increase the amount and quality of learning   time by:

·       Establish 45 minute Tiger Time for focused Tier Two   Interventions for reading and math, Tier One guided reading lessons, and 3rd,   4th and 5th grade reading and STEM acceleration.

·       Working with the Boys and Girls Club to provide an Extended Day   program with targeted students in grades 3 - 5 at risk of not meeting   expected standards in content areas. Additionally, students practice   test-taking skills in preparation for criterion-referenced test.

·       Partner with the Boys and Girls Club to provide summer learning   time for at-risk learners during June. Targeted skills will be addressed to individual   students during this time.

·       Schedule mentors/tutors for students needing additional   assistance in reading and/or math.

·       Target students for double-dose of instruction during the school   day for the purpose of previewing/reviewing instruction in math and   reading/language arts.

·       Utilizing small-group instruction based on need in the classroom   setting using EIP teachers, ESOL teachers, Special Education teachers, and   paraprofessionals and class size reduction teacher(s).

 

2(d). Address the needs of all children,   particularly targeted populations, and address how the school will determine   if such needs have been met and
  are consistent with improvement plans approved under the Elementary and   Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA).

Response: Summative results per nine weeks, yearly surveys, yearly state   tests, school and district balanced scorecard and CCPRI reports will   determine if all children’s’ needs---including targeted populations---have   been met.

Artifacts/Evidence: : Description of reform strategies; Copy of each 45 day action plans, with   review team notes

examples of researched based practices, increase   in amount of learning time, resources match Title I budgets; may include research of specific programs being   used.

 

  

  

*3. Instruction by highly qualified    professional staff.

  

Response:

Instruction at Metter Intermediate School is   provided by highly qualified teachers and supported by paraprofessionals who   meet the requirements of Title I certification.

 

  

  

*3(a). Strategies to attract highly qualified    teachers to high-needs schools.

  

A. Response: We will provide   instruction by highly qualified teachers who meet the standards established   by the state ofGeorgia. (Use HiQ Report and school staff roster. Indicate how   certification deficiencies are being addressed.)

Each year teacher certification and teaching   assignments are reviewed to ensure that teachers are highly qualified under   both Title I and the standards established by the state of Georgia. Teachers   and paraprofessionals are reminded of renewal dates, procedures, and required   coursework, if needed, to renew their certification. If any teacher is out of   field, teaching assignments are changed whenever possible to meet compliance.

Staff members who have to be out for long-term   leave (e.g., maternity leave) will have their positions filled by substitutes   who are certified teachers. This fulfills the highly qualified requirement.

If at some point a regular staff member or   substitute is not highly qualified, parent letters are sent notifying parents   of the status of the teachers. At Metter Intermediate School there are   currently no teachers or paraprofessionals who require such notification.

A teacher mentoring program assigns Teacher   Support Specialists to new teachers, teachers new to the school or district,   teachers new to a grade level or subject area, and at-risk teachers. This   gives them the additional support needed to be successful. They also receive   curriculum and instructional support from the District Literacy Director.

Strategies to attract highly qualified   teachers include:

·       Have current staff members contact their peers in other   locations to solicit possible candidates for teaching at Metter Intermediate   School.

·       Possible quality candidates will be sent information about the   school and encouraged to visit the school’s website which includes all facets   of the school’s operations.

·       When candidates are interviewed and desirable, the school’s   interview team will send a card of acknowledgement and support.

·       Teacher candidates will be informed of the teacher induction and   mentor program upon being hired by the school system.

·       Inform candidates of ways staff is supported and recognized   throughout the school year.

·       Our district is involved in an effort to attract highly   qualified teachers by having Recruitment Teams visit area colleges.   Additionally, our Candler County website has a link to a video that   highlights the local school system and the desirable surrounding areas for   living.

·       We post openings on our local website and Teach Georgia.

·       Emails are sent to alert all Candler County employees of any employment   opportunities.

Artifacts/Evidence: CPI report (no SSN); list of non-HiQ staff as   appropriate; narrative addressing 3(a); copy of principal attestation; copy   of letter to parents of any student assigned to a non-HiQ   teacher/paraprofessional for 4 weeks or more (substitutes included); list of   staff with assignments; TSS and/or other special assignments

 

  

  

*4. Professional development for staff to    enable all children in the school

  

Response:

A. We have included teachers, principals, and   paraprofessionals and, if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and   other staff in our staff development that addresses the root causes of our   identified needs. For example . . . (Be specific)

We have included teachers, principals, and   paraprofessionals and, if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and   other staff in our staff development that addresses the root causes of our   identified needs. For example, staff members analyzed norm-referenced and   criterion-referenced test results as well as other student assessments and   surveys to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the school to plan for   professional development.

Groups are also focused on Literacy Strategies   for all students to include writing across all content areas.

Our school-wide improvement plan, on-going   professional learning, mission, and goals are all shared with stakeholders at   School Council meetings, FBI council meetings, parent meetings and informal   gatherings. These are also posted on the school and district websites for   public access. Stakeholders take an active interest in helping our school   meet its goals

B. We have aligned professional development   with the State’s academic content and student academic achievement standards   . . .

All professional development has been aligned   with the State’s academic content standards and all staff members (certified   and classified) are engaged in professional learning opportunities throughout   the year. Staff development days have been built into the school calendar as   well as after school and job-embedded learning opportunities. Each quarter   every Professional Learning Community analyzes, reviews, and revises its   school improvement plan. Strategies that have been successful for each team   are shared through the Leadership Team. Some of the actions completed by   groups are as follows:

o  Developing assessment tools

o  Identifying strategies/materials to address   needs

o  Plan lessons for how each member will use the   strategy/material

o  Develop/design materials to address needs

o  Demonstrate/practice strategies members have   used or will use

o  Examine samples of student work for evidence   of student understanding

o  Assess results of using strategies in   classrooms

o  Visit each other’s classrooms to observe   strategies in action

o  Research proven strategies

o  Read professional research articles

At present the groups have targeted areas that   the comprehensive needs assessment identified as areas in need of   improvement. Overall groups will be focused on designing formative   assessments which will help to drive and differentiate instruction.

Staff development days are planned into the   school calendar for professional development and collaboration.

C. We have devoted sufficient resources to   carry out effectively the professional development activities that address   the root causes of academic problems. For example . . . (money, time,   resources, instructional coaches)

·       Teachers of like content are provided with common planning times   daily.

·       Administrators, at both district and school level, and staff   members are members of Walkthrough teams to monitor implementation of   strategies and expectations resulting from professional learning sessions.

·       The district offers Professional Learning Courses three times a   year. Teachers from Metter Intermediate School have enrolled in Gifted   Endorsement, ESOL Endorsement, which all benefit our identified populations   in our needs assessment. Additionally, the district has provided training for   our teachers and paraprofessionals of SWD in the area of reading, math, RTI,   literacy strategies and Reading First.

·       The district has a Special Education Parent Mentor who is   available for teacher and/or parent meetings, observations, and resource help   as we address students with disabilities. Guidelines followed were   established by the Georgia Pyramid of Interventions.

·       EIP specialist provides instruction and addresses needs of   At-Risk students.

·       ESOL teachers have delivered professional learning to staff   regarding awareness and strategies that will help our ELL population of   students.

·       Sessions are planned as needed for the continued implementation   of literacy strategies, Common Core Georgia Performance Standards (CCGPS),   Marzano’s highly effective teaching strategies, and the Georgia School Keys.   Continued implementation on Standards-Based Classrooms and report cards will   be a focus this school year.

·       Our Technology specialist has on-going sessions throughout the   year to support staff use of technology. Staff members are required to log in   to these sessions and demonstrate proficiency with the technology in the   building.

·       Continue and refine goal setting (SMART goals) and   monitoring/graphing results by students.

·       Reinforce effort and provide recognition in classrooms and   during school-wide assemblies and in parent communication.

·       Resources are posted on the shared school server which allows   quick access for the Professional Learning Communities.

·       Plan and implement Family Read Night, Family Math Night, and   Family Science/Social Studies night for the purpose of teaching ways to   reinforce content skills at home.

D. We have included teachers in professional   development activities regarding the use of academic assessments. . to enable   them to provide information on, and to improve, the achievement of individual   students and the overall instructional program in the following ways . . .

We have included teachers in professional   development activities regarding the use of academic assessments to enable   them to provide information and improve the achievement of individual students,   and the overall instructional program in the following ways:

·       Test data is reviewed and discussed by Leadership Team and   brought before the whole faculty to identify areas of strengths and   weaknesses for all subgroups at Metter Intermediate School. This data is also   shared at School Council and FBI meetings.

·       Professional Learning teams meet and analyze data to plan for   flexible groups in all content areas

Artifacts/Evidence: Staff report from PL office; professional   learning plan for year; samples of site based

professional learning with sign in sheets; PD   360 report; new teacher induction agenda; planning days agendas;

RESA offerings; system offerings; copy of   yellow and blue logs

 

*5. Strategies to increase parental   involvement.

Response:

A. We have involved parents in the planning,   review, and improvement of the comprehensive schoolwide program plan by . . .

The goal of Parent Involvement at Metter   Intermediate School is to include parents as active participants in their   children's educational experience and academic success. Parent Involvement   initiatives are carefully planned to communicate with parents on a   consistent, regular basis, to involve parents in student instruction and   achievement, and to involve parents in school wide governance and decision   making.

Parents have been involved in the planning,   review, and improvement of the comprehensive school-wide school plan by   participating in the needs assessments and surveys used in developing the   school-wide plan. Parents were also a part of the school’s council and   Leadership Team. These parents played a valuable role in reviewing data,   planning, and designing a school-wide plan. The plan will be available for   all parents to review via the school website.

B. We have developed a parent involvement   policy included in our appendices that

Ø includes strategies to increase parental   involvement (such as family literacy services)

Ø describes how the school will provide   individual student academic assessment results, including a interpretation of   those results

Ø makes the comprehensive schoolwide program   plan available to the LEA, parents, and the public (internet, newspaper,   newsletters)

Ø compacts required – include with policy

Ø Parent Involvement checklist included

Artifacts/Evidence: In Title I notebook: signed and dated (month,   day year) parent compacts , one per grade level; revised parent   involvement policy and plan with month, day, year of revision, copy of   Parent Right To Know letter; dissemination of CCPRI results in multiple forms   (web, brochure, letter, meeting agendas); describe process of   dissemination individual student assessment results; how plan is available to   parents and public (web) , SES/Choice letters, as appropriate; Copy of   agenda, sign in sheets for Fall meeting to inform parents of Title I status;   sample of information to parents via Crisis Communication System; sample   power points to parents; All other parent involvement documentation kept   by PIC in folders

 

*6. Plans for assisting preschool children in   the transition from early childhood programs to local elementary school   programs.

Response:

A. Following are our plans for assisting   preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs. Also   included are transition plans for students entering middle school or high   school and entering form private schools plus students entering our school   throughout the school year . . .

Transitions from One Grade Level to Another

Vertical planning takes place among all grade   levels to ensure a smooth transition from year to year. Monthly presentations   feature various grade levels during FBI meetings. At the end of the year,   each grade level visits the next grade level for an activity and an   opportunity to learn what is expected at that grade level. Information is sent   to parents as well. At the beginning of the school year, parents and students   attend the Open House. They are introduced to their classroom, teacher, and   classmates. Teachers review expectations and needed supplies with the   parents. Grade level teachers also send emails and newsletters to parents   detailing units of study, planned activities, highlight of student successes,   and tips on how parents can help at home.

         
   

Transition of 5th Graders to     Middle School:

   

Coordination also takes place between Metter     Middle School and Metter Intermediate School to ease the transition from 5th     grade to middle school. This transition begins at the beginning of 5th     grade with the scheduling and flexible grouping of students. Students are     given the opportunity to adjust to changing classes, getting organized, and     handling the stress of a full academic course load. Classroom guidance     activities throughout the year focus on social skills that will help them     successfully transition from intermediate to middle school.

   

Fifth grade teachers meet with middle school     teachers and counselors and assist them with making schedules for the upcoming     6th grade students. Much time and consideration is taken to make     certain that all students are scheduled appropriately. An Orientation Day     is made available in the spring giving the students an opportunity during     the school day to visit the middle school that they will be attending. The     middle schools give them a tour of the school, provide classroom visits,     and introduce them to all of the opportunities in middle school life. These     children return with enthusiasm and excitement about the new adventure     waiting for them in the fall. Additionally, there is a 5th grade     Parent Night planned by Metter Middle School for parent induction to middle     school transition.

   

Artifacts/Evidence: Description of transition plans from early   childhood to elementary to middle to high school;

flyers for invitations to transition schools

 

*7. Measures to include teachers in the   decisions regarding the use of assessment to provide information on, and to   improve, the performance of individual students and the overall instructional   program.

Response:

A. The ways that we include teachers in   decisions regarding use of academic assessment are . . .

Teachers are included in decisions regarding   use of academic assessment as the school follows recommended guidelines set   by the state of Georgia as a planning process for continuous improvement. Our   faculty met on several occasions at the beginning of the school year and   throughout the school year and followed this process resulting in the   school-wide improvement plan. This plan then serves as the framework   Professional Learning Communities. Student learning data guides these plans and   specific strategies and resources are explored that will improve student   achievement.

·       All relevant students learning data (School level assessments,   CRCT Reports, State Writing Assessments, and CCPRI Reports) was collected and   analyzed to determine student learning needs. Using historical data we looked   for trends in achievement for content areas, domains, and subgroups. We   looked for percentages of students in each performance level by content   areas, domains, and subgroups. Consideration was also made for meeting future   increases in the CCPRI. Our overall strengths and weaknesses were determined.

·       Our demographic data was analyzed for student needs, which   included school profile, attendance, and student support team data. We   considered how this data might influence our student placement, school-wide   policies and procedures, and school-wide processes (pyramid of   interventions).

·       Our recent perception data from various surveys (Certified Staff   Survey and Parent Surveys) was analyzed to determine how beliefs and   understandings influence our practices.

·       The school leadership team is responsible for the implementation   and monitoring the progress of the goals and strategies.

·       School-based team meetings ensure all teacher teams understand   their roles in implementing the school-wide improvement plan.

·       Walkthroughs are conducted as a process for monitoring   implementation of the school-wide improvement plan.

·       Formative assessments are monitored and discussed with all   appropriate groups.

·       Periodic meetings are set to share with the whole faculty the   successful strategies that have been generated, refined, and learned to   promote improvement in the identified areas of weakness.

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph; leadership team meeting   notes; data analysis meetings; benchmark

reviews; data notebook contents page;   reflection sheets; data day schedules; sample of benchmark/AIMS results by

demographics; Various teams at schools   (Quality, SWAT, KEYS)

 

*8. Coordination and integration of Federal,   State, and local services and programs.

Response:

A. This component requires a description of   how the school will implement the programs listed above, a description of how   Title I resources and other resources will be coordinated to support student   achievement goals in the school improvement plan, and a listing of all state   and federal programs consolidated in the schoolwide plan.

Programs identified will be conducted through   Title I and other resources---coordinated at the school and district   levels---to support student achievement.

 

8(a). List of State and local educational   agency programs and other federal programs that will be included.

Response:

Title IIA, Title IID, Title III, Title IV,   Title VI, Professional Learning, EIP, Gifted and QBE funds.

 

8(b). Description of how resources from Title   I and other sources will be used.

Response:

Program Name: Title I

The Title I budget is developed by the   principal with input from the school improvement committees, the leadership   team, school council, PTA parent representative, the COLT (Central Office Leadership   Team) team and other interested stakeholders. The staff and stakeholders   review student achievement data and existing resources and make   recommendations and suggestions for expenditures of the Title I funds to   ensure that all students meet the state standards. After considering the   recommendations, the principal completes a Title I planner for the school   allocation and submits it to the LEA Director of Federal Programs for   approval. Examples of expenditures from the Title I budget are:

·       Salaries and benefits for personnel to reduce class size

·       Salaries and benefits for personnel to address content areas   below expectations (e.g., literacy)

·       Supplemental teaching materials

·       Supplemental books

·       Professional development, including conferences registrations,   stipends, purchased professional services, travel, lodging

·       Materials for Parent Involvement

·       Instructional technology

·       Extended day/ supplemental instruction

·       Reading Intervention Specialist

Program Name: Title 1-C Migrant

Title I –C funds are used to pay for the   salaries and benefits for three Family Intervention Specialists who serve   migrant students in Candler County. The two Specialists identify migrant   children according to federal criteria and provide instructional and support   services to increase the academic achievement of eligible migrant students.

Program Name: Title IIA

The purpose of the program is to increase   academic achievement by improving teacher and principal quality. This program   is carried out by: increasing the number of highly qualified teachers in   classrooms; improving the skills of principals and assistant principals in   schools; and increasing the effectiveness of teachers and principals by   holding LEAs and schools accountable for improvements in student academic   achievement. The Director of Professional Learning is primarily responsible   for the planning and expenditure of Title II A funds. Guidelines are as   follows:

·       Ensure that activities are aligned with state standards,   research-based, and contribute to improvements in student academic   achievement;

·       Coordinate the program with other professional development   programs;

·       Develop professional development activities in a collaborative   fashion and seek the input of teachers, principals, parents, administrators,   paraprofessionals, and other school personnel;

·       Use funds to meet the requirement that all teachers be   "highly qualified" by the end of the 2005-06 school year, develop   annual objectives for measuring progress toward this requirement; and

Use funds to ensure that all current   paraprofessionals with instructional duties in any program supported with   Title I, Part A, funds (other than translators and parent-involvement   liaisons) have, by January 2006, completed at least two years of study at an   institution of higher education, obtained an associate's (or higher) degree,   or met a rigorous standard of quality and can demonstrate academic skills and   knowledge.

Program: Title III

Title III addresses the education of Limited   English Proficient and Immigrant students.

Title III LEP funds are to be used in a   supplemental manner. In other words, Title III funds may not fund a   district’s mandated bilingual or ESL programs and related expenses. The   Candler County School System uses funds as mandated by Title III legislation   in the following ways:

·       Supplemental instructional programs (such as after school,   summer or on weekends) to increase English proficiency of LEP/ELLs, and

·       Professional development of ESL, bilingual, and/or classroom   teachers who teach LEPs.

Program: Title IV

The Candler County School System is a member   of the Title IV Consortium of which First District RESA is the fiscal agent.   The First District RESA Safe and Drug Free Schools Program assists school   systems to coordinate prevention initiatives to prevent school violence and   provide programs that prevent the illegal use of alcohol, tobacco and other   drugs. These programs, strategies, and skills are based on target needs and   use nationally recognized scientifically based approaches. The First District   RESA Program provides planning, training/staff development, curriculum   implementation and technical assistance to schools in order for them to meet   federal and state Drug Free Schools guidelines. There is a Prevention   Education Consultant who provides technical assistance and other services to   the Candler County School System to assist us with compliance to NCLB.

Program: 20 Day Additional Instruction

The 20-Day Additional Instruction Program is   developed in conjunction with the Title I program to address the needs of   targeted students in reading and math using small group instruction before   and after school. Computer-assisted instructional software programs and   research-based best practices are used to reinforce instruction with   individualized assignments at each student’s level. 20-Day funds can only be   used for salaries and benefits for instructional support.

Program: ESOL (English Speakers of Other   Languages)

The ESOL program is developed in conjunction   with the Title I program to meet the needs of the English Language Learner.   The program provides targeted students with additional instructional support   in acquiring English language skills that support mastery of the GPS and   state content and achievement standards. ESOL funds are used to provide the   following resources:

· Salaries and benefits for instructional   support w/Hispanic Educational Literacy Program (HELP)

· Supplemental books and materials

· Instructional software and technology

Locally Funded Programs include:

·    
 
Tiger Time

·       Gifted 21st Century Tools

·       Teacher Special Projects Grants


 
These programs are   designed to provide individualized assessment information in order to meet   student achievement needs.

The schoolwide program will coordinate with   other programs such as Even Start, Head Start or other preschool programs at   the elementary level, or School-to-Work, Perkins or other state programs at   the secondary level.

The schoolwide program and Communities in   Schools program work together to provide tutoring and after-school assistance   to students. UGA Extension office provides assistance with professional   development, grants, and tutoring. Family Connections provides assistance   with home-school connections. Work Ready supports adult continuing education   and certification of employability skills for family members ages eighteen   and older.

Salaries and benefits, instructional   materials, parent involvement, professional development, and technology   receive support from all funding sources to implement the schoolwide program.   See individual budgets for details benefits for the Family Intervention   Specialist who serves migrant students in Candler County. The Specialist   identifies migrant children according to federal criteria and provides   instructional and support services to increase the academic achievement of   eligible migrant students.

The following agencies provide technical   assistance with this plan.

CCBOE COLT Team Members

First District RESA

District Title-I Office

Area Title-I Specialist

GLISI

 

8(c). Plan developed in coordination with   other programs, including those under the School-to-Work Opportunities Act of   1994, the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act, and National   and Community Service Act of 1990.

Response:

The schoolwide program will coordinate with   other programs such as Even Start, Head Start or other preschool programs at   the elementary level, or School-to-Work, Perkins or other state programs at   the secondary level.

The schoolwide program and Communities in   Schools program work together to provide tutoring and after-school assistance   to students. UGA Extension office provides assistance with professional   development, grants, and tutoring. Family Connections provides assistance   with home-school connections. Work Ready supports adult continuing education   and certification of employability skills for family members ages eighteen   and older.

Salaries and benefits, instructional   materials, parent involvement, professional development, and technology   receive support from all funding sources to implement the schoolwide program.   See individual budgets for details benefits for the Family Intervention   Specialist who serves migrant students in Candler County. The Specialist   identifies migrant children according to federal criteria and provides   instructional and support services to increase the academic achievement of   eligible migrant students.

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph of school programs and   resources including Title I, II, III, IV, IDEA (Sp. Ed), Gifted, middle school   themes, as appropriate; budget planners, list of Title I paid personnel,   Title I inventory; principal attestation of Title I inventory, reviewed,   dated, and signed; Glynn County School System Inventory Plan; Fraud policy   check off sheet signed.

 

*9. Activities to ensure that students who   experience difficulty mastering standards shall be provided with effective,   timely assistance, which shall include:

Response:

A. We are providing activities to ensure that   students who experience difficulty mastering proficient or advanced levels of   academic achievement standards shall be provided with effective, timely   additional assistance. Those activities are . . . (Especially for those   students who are struggling.)

We are providing activities to ensure student   academic success in the following ways:

All students are provided with the following   interventions at Tier I in the Pyramid of Interventions:

·       CCGPS framework

·       Differentiated instruction

·       Cooperative learning

·       Graphic organizers utilizing frame of reference for   metacognition

·       Writing Across the Curriculum

·       Before, During, After instructional protocol

·       Academic Vocabulary (Marzano)

·       Parent communication via agendas/phone calls/conferencing,   Powerschool

·       Positive behavior plan in all classrooms

·       Goal setting at individual, class and school levels

·       Classworks

·       Lexia

·       Literacy Strategies

·       6 Elements of Math

·       Tiger Time (Reading and Math Skills)

 

9(a). Measures to ensure that students’   difficulties are identified on a timely basis.

Response:

Tier II interventions include the above and   are overlaid with the additional following:

·       EIP Reading and/or Math

·       ESOL Program

·       Regular Progress monitoring

·       Small group instruction (Tiger Time)

·       Research-based ndividualized remediation with the Reading   Intervention Specialist

·       Reading Room

·       After school extended day

·       Leveled Readers

·       Classworks (more prescriptive at this level)

·       Mentors (adult & peer)

·       Individual tutoring

·       Flexible grouping

·       Parent conferences

·       Small group guidance sessions

·       Positive behavior interventions

Tier III interventions:

·       Student Support Team

·       Research-based interventions with regular progress monitoring

·       Individualized screening

·       Incentive charts

·       Individualized positive behavior incentive checklists/BIP’s

·       Frequent classroom observations

·       In depth look at individual student data (attendance, health,   family concerns, discipline, etc.)

·       Tier II interventions intensified

·       Minimum of 9-week time   period for monitoring progress

Tier IV interventions:

·       Individualized Educational Program through Special Education

·       Gifted Education

 

9(b). Periodic training for teachers in the   identification of difficulties and appropriate assistance for identified   difficulties.

Response:

The district offers Professional Learning   Courses during preplanning, post planning and throughout the school year.   Teachers from Metter Intermediate School have enrolled in Gifted Endorsement,   and ESOL Endorsement, classes which all benefit our identified populations in   our needs assessment. Additionally, the district has provided training for   our teachers and paraprofessionals of SWD in the area of reading, math, RTI,   and Literacy.

 

9c). Teacher-parent conferences that detail   what the school will do to help the student, what the parents can do to help   the student, and additional assistance available to the student at the school   or n the community.

Response:

Parent conferences are scheduled on a regular   basis before, during, and after school hours. Teachers keep a record of   parent conferences held throughout the year and encourage all parents to   attend to ensure that all parents have an opportunity to participate in   parent conferences. Individual student assessment results and interpretation   of these results as well as a description and explanation of the school's   curriculum are provided at these parent- teacher conferences.

Artifacts/Evidence: : Descriptive paragraph addressing (a), (b),   (c); intersession schedules; after school

schedules; activities targeting   migrant, ELL, SWD, ED; parent-teacher conference forms; student led   conference

forms; number of parent teacher conferences   held during year; copy of student instructional plan; progress monitoring

report for intervention and computer assisted   programs; reflection questions; copy of EIP/ESOL notification; grade

distribution report;

 

10. Description of how individual student   assessment results and interpretation will be provided to parents.

Response:

· Parents will have live access to student   grades via our Parent Portal (on district and school website)

· During our open house in the fall, sub-group   assessment data for the year will be shared with parents and students via a   PowerPoint presentation

· Parents will receive mid-term progress   reports, report cards, Parent Portal reports, and Agenda Messages during the   year to maintain up-to-date progress of individual students

· Parent meetings will enable teachers and   school employees to share and interpret information relative to student performance

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph refer to Infinite   Campus; report cards; Thinkgate; Longitudinal Data

System.; data sheets; goal sheets; mandated   test results; benchmark tests results

 

11. Provisions for the collection and disaggregation   of data on the achievement and assessment results of students.

Response:

The district will collect data from multiple   sources including state reports, LDS, software programs, such as Classworks, Lexia,   HeadSprout, Read 180 and iSTEEP to disaggregate and interpret data relative   to student performance and achievement.

Data will be utilized during parent   conferences, Board of Education meetings, PLC meetings, Leadership meetings,   and other workshops and conferences that examine student progress.

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph, sample of benchmark   results; samples of AIM results; sample of

letter to parents regarding assessment results

 

12. Provisions to ensure that disaggregated   assessment results for each category are valid and reliable.

Response:

The district follows the guidance of the GADOE   Division of Standards, Instruction, and Assessment in order to obtain the   most valid and reliable disaggregated assessment results. The tests are   designed to measure how well students acquire, learn and accomplish the   knowledge and skills that are outlined in the Georgia Performance Standards.   Other local measures include benchmark testing and both formative and   summative classroom assessments of the standards being taught.

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph; data review team   meetings; CCPRI reports; reflection on subgroups

 

13. Provisions for public reporting of   disaggregated data.

Response:

The public will have access to student data   through CCPRI reports available through the Governor’s Office of Educational   Accountability. For the convenience of all of our stakeholders, a link has   been provided on the school’s website.

The school’s balanced scorecard, available on   the school’s website, will be used to report disaggregated data to the public

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph, meeting agenda with   sign in; sample power points; agenda for Title I

presentation with sign in; school council with   agenda and sign in, website, state report card

 

14. Plan developed during a one-year period,   unless LEA, after considering the recommendation of its technical assistance   providers, determines that less time is needed to develop and implement the   schoolwide program.

Response:

CCSD has developed the schoolwide program plan   for a one year period. The plan is updated annually in accordance with the   GADOE Schoolwide Program Checklist.

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph with revision dates (month,   day, year); agenda and sign in for

meeting of revision

 

15. Plan developed with the involvement of the   community to be served and individuals who will carry out the plan including   teachers, principals, other school staff, and pupil service personnel,   parents and students (if secondary).

Response:

Each school developed a schoolwide program   plan with the involvement of teachers, principals, other school staff, pupil   service personnel, parents, and students (if secondary). Parents and other   stakeholders are invited to review and revise the plan annually.

Stakeholders participate in evaluating the   plan annually in accordance with the GADOE Schoolwide Program Checklist.

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph to include members of   team who developed and will implement plan;

date of review of plan with participating   members signatures

 

16. Plan available to the LEA, parents, and   the public.

Response:

The Title I plan will be available to all   stakeholders via the school’s website and hard copies will be available to   the public in the school’s main office

A hard copy is available for each parent at   the Title I Annual meeting.

Artifacts/Evidence: Descriptive paragraph; copy of website link

 

17. Plan translated to the extent feasible,   into any language that a significant percentage of
  the parents of participating students in the school speak as their primary   language.

Response:

The majority of our parents speak English.   Spanish is the only other language spoken as the primary language of a small   percentage of our parents/families. A copy of the notification letter to   provide translation of the plan in Spanish is attached with this plan.

As necessary, the plan will be available to   individuals whose primary language is not English or Spanish.

Artifacts/Evidence: List of students who require plan in other   language, one for each semester; samples of

letters, flyers, in other language.

 

18. Plan is subject to the school improvement   provisions of Section 1116.

Response:

Candler County School District will adhere to   the school improvement provisions as outlined in Section 1116 of the ESEA.

Artifacts/Evidence: Statement of CCPRI status of school and/or   copy of CCPRI report. If distinguished, include

Years and budget planner. If NI, include years   and consequences.

 


Parent Involvement Policy

Metter Intermediate School Parent Involvement Policy 2014 - 2015

Learning for students takes place not only at school, but at home and throughout the community. At Metter Intermediate School we believe that the school had a responsibility to provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables the children served under Title I to meet and exceed the State’s student performance standards. The strengths and contributions of families and communities are highly valued. Parent involvement is key to the success of students.

Metter Intermediate School meaningfully involves parents and the community in every aspect from planning and implementation to reflection and evaluation. This has been very important. Metter Intermediate School had a long history of working collaboratively with parents and the community.

Parents and the community are integrated into the school [program through their involvement in the governance structure, volunteering and PTA programs, and voice in shared decision-making. There is a shared vision and high expectations for student learning and achievement. Working together provides a clearer sense of direction and unity of purpose, as well as providing opportunities to exchange ideas and viewpoints.

 

We have involved parents in the planning, review, and improvement of the comprehensive school wide program plan by involving parents in the needs assessments and surveys used in developing the school wide plan. We also included two parents on the school‘s Council and two parents on the School Council. These parents have played a valuable role in reviewing data, planning, and designing a School wide plan. A Title I Parent Involvement Committee will meet biannually to discuss, review, and implement changes as needed to the Parent Involvement Policy and Plan, System level gifted task force, and the special education parent…

 

The Parent Involvement Policy and the Parent Involvement Plan will be available on the district website and a parent informational session will be held in the fall to review the plan and discuss concerns with parents. A copy of the School Improvement Plan is available in the office for review by parents and is also on the school’s website on the internet. The plan will be translated to the extent feasible, into any language that a significant percentage or the parents of participating students speak as their primary language. Any unsatisfactory parent comments regarding the School wide Plan will be attached to the plan when submitted to the LEA.

 

The goal of Parent Involvement at Metter Intermediate School is to include parents as active participants in their children’s educational experience and academic success. Parent Involvement initiatives are carefully planned to communicate with parents on a consistent, regular basis, too involved parents in student instruction and achievement, and to involve parents in school wide governance and decision making.

·        Parents-Child Enrichment Opportunities, Parent Trainings, and Parent Meetings: Parent Involvement Opportunities are scheduled throughout the school year using a flexible schedule and may provide, with funds provided under Title I, transportation, childcare, or home visits as such services relate to parental involvement to eliminate parent involvement barriers.

 

·        Annual Meeting: An annual meeting will be held at a convenient time to which all parents shall be invited and encouraged to attend. The purpose of the meeting is to inform parents of their schools and district’s participation under Title I and to explain Title I, its’ requirements, and right to be involved. Additionally, the results of the annual school review are discussed, including the school’s overall performance on state mandated assessments. The following areas to be addressed at the annual meeting and at subsequent parent meetings held throughout the school year include:

1.      National Education Goals

2.      State’s content standards and student performance standards

3.      School improvement

4.      Components of a school wide plan

5.      State and local assessments

6.      Requirements of Title I, Part A

7.      Ways parents can monitor their children’s progress and work with educators to improve the performance of their children.

8.      Ways parents can participate in decisions relating to the education of their children.

·        Title I Parent Involvement Committee: This committee consists of the school principal, teachers, parents, and community members to represent the diverse population of students within the school. This committee meets quarterly and periodically reviews and implements changes as needed to the school Parent Involvement Policy and Plan, This council is involved in the joint development and evaluation of the school-parent compact that outlines how the school and the parents will be responsible for supporting student learning. This committee will also work with parents to evaluate the effectiveness of the parent involvement initiatives as a measure of performance evaluations of the school.

·        Coordinate and Integrate Parent Involvement with other programs: We will coordinate and integrate our parent involvement efforts with FACES (Family and Children Educational Services), Head Start, Title I, Migrant, Title I-C, Homeless as appropriate, as well as community-based organizations and businesses.

·        Ongoing communication between school and parents: We will address the importance of parent-teacher communication via parent conferences, frequent reports on children’s progress, and by providing access to staff and opportunities to volunteer and participate in school activities. The Tiles I Parent Involvement Policy and Plan will be distributed to all parents at the beginning of the school year for their review and input. Additional opportunities for Parent Involvement and Parent-Teacher Communication are listed below:

Parent Involvement Plan and Strategies to Support the Title I Parent Involvement Policy:

Parent-Child Enrichment Opportunities, Parent Trainings, and Parent Meeting:

1.      Open House: Each year, the staff of Metter Intermediate School welcomes new and returning parents to the school for an open house. The event is traditionally held prior to the beginning of school and a valuable opportunity for parents to tour the school, meet the teachers, and ask question about the expectations for the school year. Information is also given regarding school-related programs and volunteer opportunities for parents.

2.      Academic Nights: Academic nights focusing on a variety of topics are held throughout the year. These events provide parents with valuable information regarding the school’s curriculum and how they can support student achievement at home. Large and small group opportunities are provided to encourage parents to explore the curriculum with their children and to ask questions. Academic Nights and other parent meetings will be held at various times and locations. The principal and administration will provide timely responses to parent suggestions provided at these meetings.

3.      FBI (Family Being Involved) meetings are held through-out the school year and provide an opportunity to present curriculum and academic information to parents, as well as support opportunities.

4.      School Council: Our school council consists of members who are representative of school. They provide advice, recommendations, and assistance. These representatives attend meetings and share ideas for school improvement, provide support for teachers and administrators, and are a part of the decision-making process.

5.      School Leadership Team: Our school leadership team consists of representatives from all grade levels, support personnel, and administration. Portions of our leadership team are parents. This committee serves as a decision-making team for the school and works to plan for curriculum implementation and evaluation, to evaluate student achievement and performance, and to plan for school improvement.

6.      Parent Meetings: The principal shares pertinent information with parents regarding upcoming events and decisions at meetings. Parents are notified of meetings by website, phone tree, and newsletters. The meeting provides parents the opportunity to discuss questions and concerns with the principal. The principal and administration will provide timely responses to parent suggestions provided at these meetings. The principal is also available for meetings concerning private issues.

7.      Parent Conferences: Parent conferences are scheduled on a regular basis before, during, and after school hours. Teachers keep a record of parent conferences held throughout the year and encourage all parents to attend. To ensure that all parents are included in parent conferences. Individual student assessment results and interpretation of these results as well as a description and explanation of the school’s curriculum are provided at these parent-teacher conferences.

8.      Parent-School Compacts: Parents are asked to set goals for themselves in participating in their child’s education. These goals are listed along with the teacher and administrative/instruction team in a compact for all students.

9.      Counselor: The counselor is available to assist parents with specific concerns. Resources are also available to assist parents and students with specific concerns including difficulties with school, problems with peers, anger, and grief. Parenting resources such as books and periodicals are also available.

10.   Volunteer Program: Parents may volunteer at our school in a variety of ways. Please contact the principal for more information.

11.   Thanksgiving Luncheon: The Thanksgiving Luncheon is held annually and provides a fun opportunity for fellowship at the school.

12.   School Book Fair: Our annual book fair provides parents with an opportunity to select books for their children and to volunteer at the school.

13.   Staff Development: MIS faculty and staff will work together to educate teachers and other staff, in the value and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, implement and coordinate parent programs, and build ties between home and school.

 

Communication between School and Parents on an Ongoing Basis:

1.      Newsletters: Monthly newsletters are sent to parents by individual teams. Theses newsletters contain valuable information for parents regarding upcoming events, student success, and tips for helping students achieve.

2.      Parent Phone Calling System: Important information for parents is communicated on a regular basis via a mass calling system. This system allows the school administration to contact parents via telephone regarding upcoming events and important announcements.

3.      Agendas: All students in grades 4-5 receive a daily agenda which is to be signed daily by teachers and each night by parents. These agendas provide an opportunity for parents and teachers to communicate on a daily basis regarding expectations for students, student progress, and concerns. The agendas also contain the student handbook.

4.      Parent Surveys: Throughout the year, parents are given the opportunity to respond to various surveys. These surveys are sent home with the students for parents to complete as well as posted on the school website. A Title I Parent Involvement Survey will be conducted during the 2010-2011 school year.

5.      School Website: Our school website provides pertinent information for parents and communicates members. Parent links include information regarding student achievement, school improvement, the school lunch menu, upcoming events.

6.      Power School: is the district student information website that provides parents with information regarding their child’s attendance and a variety of other factors concerning academic performance.

7.      High Qualified Teacher Notification: The school communicates with parents via certified mail as to the statue of teacher qualifications. The Parents Right-to-Know as identified by Section 1111 – No Child Left Behind (Public Law 107-110) requires schools to notify parents of students who may be taught by a teacher that is not highly qualified as identifies by the Georgia Department of Education and the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.

 

 

Parent Right:

·        Parents have the right to receive information on how they can support their children’s learning at home.

·        Parents have the right to have their children’s performance and report cards clearly explained during parent-teacher conferences, and in other school meetings.

·        Parents have the right to express their opinions, register their concerns addressed in a timely manner be appropriate school personnel.

·        Parents have the right to be provided with opportunities for their involvement in the school community through parent-teacher conference days, student-parent days, swap days, etc.

·        Parents have the right to be given reasonable access to the school building. Parents have the right to observe their child in class.

·        Parents have the right to know that the school will maintain up-to-date emergency contact and health information.

·        Parents have the right to receive information about the schools’ policies and procedures and have access to their children’s records.

Parent Responsibilities:

·        Parents will support efforts to raise student achievement and will participate in ongoing two-way communication with the school to insure early identification of student needs.

·        After teacher notification, parents will follow up with the school or teacher if such follow up is needed and attend schedules meeting; make phone calls, email, or notes to maintain contact.

·        Parents will participate in discussions and decisions relating to the education of their children with appropriate school personnel. Parents will stay abreast of graduation requirements.

·        Parents will learn about opportunities for parental involvement at school and at the district level and get involved if at all possible.

·        Parents will know and follow school procedures for parent access to the school building.

·        Parents are to encourage their children to resolve conflicts in a respectful and positive manner. Parents will encourage students to report problems to their teachers and administration.

·        Parents are required to provide the school with current a) family addresses & telephone number; b) accurate emergency contacts and c) health information. Parents will have their children immunized.

·        Parents will be familiar with the school calendar, school safety plan, discipline code, and will discuss these topics with their children.

Student Responsibilities:

·        Students will study for examinations, do homework and other assignments.

·        Students will listen to and talk with their parents and teachers about their performance and progress.

·        Students will talk to their families about what they are learning and doing in school. Students will stay abreast of graduation requirements and monitor their transcript.

·        Students will know and follow school procedures for access to the school building.

·        Students will strive to resolve conflicts in a positive and respectful manner and seek help from teachers and the administration when needed.

·        Students will transmit any necessary correspondence to and from school personnel and parents. Students will update the staff with phone numbers and addresses.

·        Students will be familiar with the school calendar, school safety plan, discipline code, and will discuss these topics with their parents. Students will follow school discipline code on the bus, at school and at extra-curricular events.

School Responsibilities:

·        The school will provide information and tools to parents so they can help their children to achieve academic and social progress.

·        The school will provide opportunities for parents to discuss student achievement as reported on report cards and/or during parent-teacher conferences.

·        The school will be responsive to parents’ questions and concerns in a timely manner. The school will provide information to parents on the complaint processes available to them. Parents will receive a welcoming environment for all parents.

·        The school will offer specific opportunities for parent involvement, make them readily available and provide a welcoming environment for all parents

·        The school will communicate school procedures and policies for parent access to the school building and to their children’s records.

·        The school will maintain up-to-date emergency contact and health information.

·        The school will provide to parents a clear description and explanation of the school calendar, school safety plan, the discipline code and the parent-school communication plan.